Pasta

TOP 4 Pasta Recipes

Christopher Robinson

In this article we have collected for you the best recipes for pasta among them you will find exactly what will please you, you can choose by cooking time, calories or simply by appearance. This dish is perfect to please yourself and your friends, it does not take much time and effort, so it is in the top favorite dishes of many of my friends! Bon appetit!  Jump to Recipe

Pasta  is a type of food typically made from an unleavened dough of wheat flour mixed with water or eggs, and formed into sheets or other shapes, then cooked by boiling or baking. Rice flour, or legumes such as beans or lentils, are sometimes used in place of wheat flour to yield a different taste and texture, or as a gluten-free alternative. Pasta is a staple food of Italian cuisine. Wiki

 

1.Homemade Pasta

Homemade Pasta

This fresh homemade pasta is SO delicious and easy to make! Serve it simply with olive oil and Parmesan cheese, or use it in your favorite pasta recipes.
Prep Time 30 mins
Servings 3 People

Equipment

  • KitchenAid Mixer
  • Pasta Attachment
  • All-Purpose Flour

Ingredients
  

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour spooned & leveled
  • 3 large eggs
  • ½ teaspoon sea salt
  • ½ tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

Instructions
 

  • Place the flour on a clean work surface and make a nest. Add the eggs, olive oil, and salt to the center and use a fork to gently break up the eggs, keeping the flour walls intact as best as you can. Use your hands to gently bring the flour inward to incorporate. Continue working the dough with your hands to bring it together into a shaggy ball.
  • Knead the dough for 8 to 10 minutes. At the beginning, the dough should feel pretty dry, but stick with it! It might not feel like it’s going to come together, but after 8-10 minutes of kneading, it should become cohesive and smooth. If the dough still seems too dry, sprinkle your fingers with a tiny bit of water to incorporate. If it’s too sticky, dust more flour onto your work surface. Shape the dough into a ball, wrap in plastic wrap, and let rest at room temperature for 30 minutes.
  • Dust 2 large baking sheets with flour and set aside.
  • Slice the dough into four pieces. Gently flatten one into an oval disk. Run the dough through the Pasta Roller Attachment three times on level 1 (the widest setting).
  • Set the dough piece onto a countertop or work surface. Fold both short ends in to meet in the center, then fold the dough in half to form a rectangle (see photo above).
  • Run the dough through the pasta roller three times on level 2, three times on level 3, and one time each on levels 4, 5, and 6.
  • Lay half of the pasta sheet onto the floured baking sheet and sprinkle with flour before folding the other half on top. Sprinkle more flour on top of the second half. Every side should be floured so that your final pasta noodles won't stick together.
  • Repeat with remaining dough.
  • Run the pasta sheets through the Pasta Cutter Attachment (pictured is the fettuccine cutter). Repeat with remaining dough. Cook the pasta in a pot of salted boiling water for 1 to 2 minutes.

Notes

Fresh pasta can be stored in the fridge, wrapped in plastic wrap, for up to 2 days.

Nutrition Facts

Amount Per Serving
Calories 395
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 8 g 12 %
Saturated Fat 2 g 10 %
Trans Fat 0 g
Cholesterol 186 mg 62 %
Sodium 315 mg 13 %
Total Carbohydrate 64 g 21 %
Dietary Fiber 2 g 9 %
Total Sugars 0 g
Includes – Added Sugars
Protein 15 g 30 %
Vitamin D 1 µg 7 %
Calcium 41 mg 4 %
Iron 5 mg 26 %
Potassium 158 mg 3 %

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

See also:  Strawberry Crunch Cake Recipe

Nutrition Facts

4 servings per container

Amount Per Serving
Calories 282
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 4 g 6 %
Saturated Fat 1 g 6 %
Trans Fat 0 g
Cholesterol 140 mg 47 %
Sodium 233 mg 10 %
Total Carbohydrate 48 g 16 %
Dietary Fiber 2 g 7 %
Total Sugars 0 g
Includes – Added Sugars
Protein 11 g 22 %
Vitamin D 1 µg 5 %
Calcium 30 mg 3 %
Iron 1 mg 8 %
Potassium 119 mg 3 %

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

Show more information about calories

NUTRITION CLAIMS

Low Fat • Sugar Conscious • Low Potassium • Kidney Friendly • Vegetarian • Pescatarian • Mediterranean • Dairy Free • Milk Free • Peanut Free • Tree Nut Free • Soy Free • Fish Free • Shellfish Free • Pork Free • Red Meat Free • Crustacean Free • Celery Free • Mustard Free • Sesame Free • Lupine Free • Mollusk Free • Alcohol Free • No Oil Added • No Sugar Added • Sulphite Free • Kosher • B Healthy

Nutrient Amount % Daily Value*
Fat 4 g 6 %
Saturated 1 g 6 %
Trans 0 g
Monounsaturated 1 g
Polyunsaturated 1 g
Carbs 48 g 16 %
Fiber 2 g 7 %
Total Sugars 0 g
Added Sugars
Protein 11 g 22 %
Cholesterol 140 mg 47 %
Sodium 233 mg 10 %
Calcium 30 mg 3 %
Magnesium 18 mg 4 %
Potassium 119 mg 3 %
Iron 1 mg 8 %
Zinc 1 mg 8 %
Phosphorus 142 mg 20 %
Vitamin A 60 µg 7 %
Vitamin C 0 mg 0 %
Thiamin (B1) 0 mg 8 %
Riboflavin (B2) 0 mg 15 %
Niacin (B3) 1 mg 5 %
Vitamin B6 0 mg 7 %
Folate (Equivalent) 34 µg 8 %
Folate (Food) 34 µg
Vitamin B12 0 µg 14 %
Vitamin D 1 µg 5 %
Vitamin E 0 mg 3 %
Vitamin K 0 µg 0 %
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

What is the difference between pasta and spaghetti?

What is spaghetti? Spaghetti is just a long and thin piece of pasta and it is a staple in many dishes of Italian cuisine. This pasta is typically lighter in color due to it being made with refined flour, but spaghetti can also be made with whole wheat flour which leads it to have a darker color.

See also:  5 Simple Texas Chicken Spaghetti Recipes

 

Is pasta only Italian?

While we do think of pasta as a culturally Italian food, it is likely the descendent of ancient Asian noodles. A common belief about pasta is that it was brought to Italy from China by Marco Polo during the 13th century.

3.2 Ingredient Homemade Pasta Recipe (Without A Machine)

 

2 Ingredient Homemade Pasta Recipe (Without A Machine)

Prep Time 25 mins
Cook Time 2 mins
Total Time 27 mins
Servings 6 People

Ingredients
  

  • 3 cups 15oz/426g all-purpose flour
  • 4 large eggs* or 5 small eggs

Instructions
 

  • On a large flat clean surface place the flour in a mound.
  • Crack all 4 large eggs into the center of the mound of flour creating a well to hold the eggs.
  • Using a light hand, break the yolks of the egg and gently bring the flour into the center of the well using your fingertips.
  • Keep incorporating the flour into the eggs until all the flour has been absorbed. This will be a messy process, but it is well worth it! Once the dough starts to form, bring it together with your palms and knead into a smooth yellow dough. This will take roughly 5 minutes. Note: If your dough is on the dry side you can add a little SLASH of water to bring it together.
  • When the dough forms a ball, cover tightly with cling wrap and refrigerate for a minimum of 30 minutes to allow the dough the rest and the gluten to develop. No longer than 18 hours.
  • After resting, remove the dough from the fridge and cut it into 4 equal pieces. Set aside and cover with a towel to stop it from drying out.
  • Flour your work surface and rolling pin and roll 1 ball of dough at a time into a large thin sheet. I don't give dimensions for this part as it varies but my one note would be to get it as thin humanly possible. Like paper-thin.
  • Once the dough has been rolled out, fold it over itself several times. Cut the roll of pasta into strips roughly 1/4 inch thick depending on what pasta you are making. Then dust some flour over the sliced strips of dough and unravel them to reveal your fresh pasta! Repeat this process with the remaining dough.
  • Set cut pasta aside on a tray and leave it out at room temperature to cook-off or cover and place in the fridge to be cooked later.
  • To Cook Fresh Pasta
  • Place a medium pot over medium-high heat and boil 8 cups of water. Once the water is boiling salt it and place the fresh pasta in the water.
  • Add the pasta and allow to cook for roughly 2 minutes or until tender. When the pasta floats to the top of the pot it is ready.
  • Strain the water off the pasta and serve as desired.

Notes

How to Store Fresh Pasta
To store fresh pasta keep it covered on a tray in the fridge for up to 3 days. It also freezes really well for up to 4 weeks.
*Large Eggs: It's important to use 4 LARGE eggs as you will need it all to moisten your dough. You could also try 5 small eggs too.

Nutrition Facts

6 servings per container

Amount Per Serving
Calories 295
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 3 g 5 %
Saturated Fat 1 g 5 %
Trans Fat 0 g
Cholesterol 94 mg 31 %
Sodium 37 mg 2 %
Total Carbohydrate 54 g 18 %
Dietary Fiber 2 g 8 %
Total Sugars 0 g
Includes – Added Sugars
Protein 11 g 21 %
Vitamin D 1 µg 3 %
Calcium 25 mg 2 %
Iron 4 mg 21 %
Potassium 111 mg 2 %

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

Show more information about calories

NUTRITION CLAIMS
Low Fat • Low Sodium • Sugar Conscious • Low Potassium • Kidney Friendly • Vegetarian • Pescatarian • Mediterranean • Dairy Free • Milk Free • Peanut Free • Tree Nut Free • Soy Free • Fish Free • Shellfish Free • Pork Free • Red Meat Free • Crustacean Free • Celery Free • Mustard Free • Sesame Free • Lupine Free • Mollusk Free • Alcohol Free • No Oil Added • No Sugar Added • Sulphite Free • Kosher • B Healthy
Nutrient Amount % Daily Value*
Fat 3 g 5 %
Saturated 1 g 5 %
Trans 0 g
Monounsaturated 1 g
Polyunsaturated 1 g
Carbs 54 g 18 %
Fiber 2 g 8 %
Total Sugars 0 g
Added Sugars
Protein 11 g 21 %
Cholesterol 94 mg 31 %
Sodium 37 mg 2 %
Calcium 25 mg 2 %
Magnesium 19 mg 4 %
Potassium 111 mg 2 %
Iron 4 mg 21 %
Zinc 1 mg 7 %
Phosphorus 127 mg 18 %
Vitamin A 41 µg 5 %
Vitamin C 0 mg 0 %
Thiamin (B1) 1 mg 47 %
Riboflavin (B2) 0 mg 36 %
Niacin (B3) 4 mg 26 %
Vitamin B6 0 mg 6 %
Folate (Equivalent) 218 µg 55 %
Folate (Food) 32 µg
Vitamin B12 0 µg 9 %
Vitamin D 1 µg 3 %
Vitamin E 0 mg 3 %
Vitamin K 0 µg 0 %
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

source: www.biggerbolderbaking.com/homemade-pasta-2-ingredient/
It can also be useful:

Is pasta a healthy dinner?

Pasta is made from grain, one of the basic food groups in a healthy diet that also can include vegetables, fruits, fish, and poultry. It’s a good source of energy and can give you fiber, too, if it’s made from whole grain. That can help with stomach problems and may help lower cholesterol.

Is pasta a junk food?

When eaten in moderation, pasta can be part of a healthy diet. Whole-grain pasta may be a better choice for many, as it is lower in calories and carbs but higher in fiber and nutrients. However, in addition to the type of pasta you pick, what you top it with is just as important.

4.A basic recipe for fresh egg pasta

A basic recipe for fresh egg pasta

Prep Time 1 hr
Servings 6 People

Ingredients
  

  • 6 large free-range eggs
  • 600 g Tipo 00 flour

Instructions
 

  • Place the flour on a board or in a bowl. Make a well in the centre and crack the eggs into it. Beat the eggs with a fork until smooth.
  • Using the tips of your fingers, mix the eggs with the flour, incorporating a little at a time, until everything is combined.
  • Knead the pieces of dough together – with a bit of work and some love and attention they’ll all bind together to give you one big, smooth lump of dough!
  • Once you’ve made your dough you need to knead and work it with your hands to develop the gluten in the flour, otherwise your pasta will be flabby and soft when you cook it, instead of springy and al dente. There’s no secret to kneading. You just have to bash the dough about a bit with your hands, squashing it into the table, reshaping it, pulling it, stretching it, squashing it again. It’s quite hard work, and after a few minutes it’s easy to see why the average Italian grandmother has arms like Frank Bruno! You’ll know when to stop – it’s when your pasta starts to feel smooth and silky instead of rough and floury.
  • Wrap the dough in clingfilm and put it in the fridge to rest for at least 30 minutes – make sure the clingfilm covers it well or it will dry out and go crusty round the edges (this will give you crusty lumps through your pasta when you roll it out, and nobody likes crusty lumps!).
  • How to roll your pasta: first of all, if you haven't got a pasta machine it's not the end of the world! All the mammas I met while travelling round Italy rolled pasta with their trusty rolling pins and they wouldn't even consider having a pasta machine in the house! When it comes to rolling, the main problem you'll have is getting the pasta thin enough to work with. It's quite difficult to get a big lump of dough rolled out in one piece, and you need a very long rolling pin to do the job properly. The way around this is to roll lots of small pieces of pasta rather than a few big ones. You'll be rolling your pasta into a more circular shape than the long rectangular shapes you'll get from a machine, but use your head and you'll be all right!
  • If using a machine to roll your pasta, make sure it's clamped firmly to a clean work surface before you start (use the longest available work surface you have). If your surface is cluttered with bits of paper, the kettle, the bread bin, the kids' homework and stuff like that, shift all this out of the way for the time being. It won't take a minute, and starting with a clear space to work in will make things much easier, I promise.
  • Dust your work surface with some Tipo 00 flour, take a lump of pasta dough the size of a large orange and press it out flat with your fingertips. Set the pasta machine at its widest setting - and roll the lump of pasta dough through it. Lightly dust the pasta with flour if it sticks at all.
  • Click the machine down a setting and roll the pasta dough through again. Fold the pasta in half, click the pasta machine back up to the widest setting and roll the dough through again. Repeat this process five or six times. It might seem like you're getting nowhere, but in fact you're working the dough, and once you've folded it and fed it through the rollers a few times, you'll feel the difference. It'll be smooth as silk and this means you're making wicked pasta!
  • Now it's time to roll the dough out properly, working it through all the settings on the machine, from the widest down to around the narrowest. Lightly dust both sides of the pasta with a little flour every time you run it through.
  • When you've got down to the narrowest setting, to give yourself a tidy sheet of pasta, fold the pasta in half lengthways, then in half again, then in half again once more until you've got a square-ish piece of dough. Turn it 90 degrees and feed it through the machine at the widest setting. As you roll it down through the settings for the last time, you should end up with a lovely rectangular silky sheet of dough with straight sides - just like a real pro! If your dough is a little cracked at the edges, fold it in half just once, click the machine back two settings and feed it through again. That should sort things out.
  • Whether you're rolling by hand or by machine you'll need to know when to stop. If you're making pasta like tagliatelle, lasagne or stracchi you'll need to roll the pasta down to between the thickness of a beer mat and a playing card; if you're making a stuffed pasta like ravioli or tortellini, you'll need to roll it down slightly thinner or to the point where you can clearly see your hand or lines of newsprint through it.
  • Once you've rolled your pasta the way you want it, you need to shape or cut it straight away. Pasta dries much quicker than you think, so whatever recipe you're doing, don't leave it more than a minute or two before cutting or shaping it. You can lay over a damp clean tea towel which will stop it from drying.

Notes

HELPFUL HACK
You can also make your dough in a food processor if you’ve got one. Just bung everything in, whiz until the flour looks like breadcrumbs, then tip the mixture on to your work surface and bring the dough together into one lump, using your hands.
Amount Per Serving
Calories 71
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 5 g 7 %
Saturated Fat 2 g 8 %
Trans Fat 0 g
Cholesterol 186 mg 62 %
Sodium 71 mg 3 %
Total Carbohydrate 0 g 0 %
Dietary Fiber 0 g 0 %
Total Sugars 0 g
Includes – Added Sugars
Protein 6 g 13 %
Vitamin D 1 µg 7 %
Calcium 28 mg 3 %
Iron 1 mg 5 %
Potassium 69 mg 1 %

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

Show more information about calories

NUTRITION CLAIMS

Low Carb • Low Sodium • Sugar Conscious • Low Potassium • Kidney Friendly • Keto Friendly • Vegetarian • Pescatarian • Paleo • Specific Carbs • Mediterranean • Dairy Free • Gluten Free • Wheat Free • Milk Free • Peanut Free • Tree Nut Free • Soy Free • Fish Free • Shellfish Free • Pork Free • Red Meat Free • Crustacean Free • Celery Free • Mustard Free • Sesame Free • Lupine Free • Mollusk Free • Alcohol Free • No Oil Added • No Sugar Added • Sulphite Free • Fodmap Free • Kosher • B Healthy

Nutrient Amount % Daily Value*
Fat 5 g 7 %
Saturated 2 g 8 %
Trans 0 g
Monounsaturated 2 g
Polyunsaturated 1 g
Carbs 0 g 0 %
Fiber 0 g 0 %
Total Sugars 0 g
Added Sugars
Protein 6 g 13 %
Cholesterol 186 mg 62 %
Sodium 71 mg 3 %
Calcium 28 mg 3 %
Magnesium 6 mg 1 %
Potassium 69 mg 1 %
Iron 1 mg 5 %
Zinc 1 mg 6 %
Phosphorus 99 mg 14 %
Vitamin A 80 µg 9 %
Vitamin C 0 mg 0 %
Thiamin (B1) 0 mg 2 %
Riboflavin (B2) 0 mg 18 %
Niacin (B3) 0 mg 0 %
Vitamin B6 0 mg 7 %
Folate (Equivalent) 24 µg 6 %
Folate (Food) 24 µg
Vitamin B12 0 µg 19 %
Vitamin D 1 µg 7 %
Vitamin E 1 mg 4 %
Vitamin K 0 µg 0 %
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

source: www.jamieoliver.com/recipes/pasta-recipes/a-basic-recipe-for-fresh-egg-pasta/

It can also be useful:

When should you eat pasta?

In fact, pasta is ideal at any time of day, even for breakfast, if that’s what you’re craving! It’s best to go for thicker, richer sauces at lunchtime and lighter versions at dinnertime.

Is eating pasta everyday healthy?

Eating pasta every day can improve head-to-toe health

As long as you’re reaching for whole grain pasta — and not the refined kind — on your supermarket shelf, a daily dish of pasta may help lower your risk of heart disease, colorectal cancer, diabetes, and obesity (via Healthline).

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